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DateLecture
20 November 2018To mark the Centenary of the Ending of WW1 - War Artists: Paul Nash, CRW Nevinson & The Great War NOTE: Today is also the day of the Members' Exhibition of Arts & Crafts in the Ralli Room
18 December 2018CHRISTMAS EVENING EVENT - Dinner followed by - Gold, Frankincense & Myrrh - Why those Gifts?
15 January 2019Manet and his Milieu
19 February 2019 AGM followed by - Opera, the melting pot of Culture
19 March 2019The Art of Stained Glass
16 April 2019Catherine the Great
21 May 2019Photography as Fine Art
18 June 2019Architectural Trompe L'Oeil
16 July 2019Australian Rock Art
17 September 2019Windsor: A Castle Restored: the fire of 1992 and the restoration
15 October 2019At the sign of The Falcon: The life & work of Harry Murphy - Goldsmith, Silversmith & unique Englishman
19 November 2019Italy & the Grand Tour
17 December 2019The Twelve Days of Christmas

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To mark the Centenary of the Ending of WW1 - War Artists: Paul Nash, CRW Nevinson & The Great War
NOTE: Today is also the day of the Members' Exhibition of Arts & Crafts in the Ralli Room
Dr David Haycock BA MA PhD Tuesday 20 November 2018

David Haycock read Modern History at the University of Oxford, and has an MA in the History of Art and a PhD in British History. He is the author of a number of books, including Paul Nash (2002) and A Crisis of Brilliance: Five Young British Artists and the Great War (2009); he has lectured widely at galleries and museums in the UK, including Tate Britain, the National Portrait Gallery, the Royal Watercolour Society and Pallant House. He was formerly a Research Fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford, and at UCLA, and was Curator of Maritime and Imperial History at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich. He is now a freelance writer and lecturer.


Paul Nash and C.R.W. Nevinson were two of the most significant artists to paint the soldiers and battlefields of World War One. Walter Sickert described Nevinson’s painting La Mitrailleuse (‘The Machine-Gun’, 1916, Tate Britain) as probably ‘the most authoritative and concentrated utterance on war in the history of painting’. Another contemporary wrote that Nash’s shattered landscapes seemed to have been ‘torn from the sulphurous rim of the inferno itself.’ This lecture explores the artistic development of both men, and their distinct but related responses to representing an extraordinary, horrific and very modern war in paint.